Al Bayt Stadium Qatar – 2022 FIFA World Cup Stadium

Al Bayt Stadium is a football stadium in Al Khor, Qatar, with a retractable roof that will be used for matches during the FIFA World Cup 2022, which will begin on November 20, 2022. This year, Qatar will host the FIFA World Cup in some of its best towns, including Doha, Lusail, Al Khor, Al Rayyan, and Al Wakrah. Due to the extreme heat in Qatar in the summer, the 2022 FIFA World Cup starts in November and ends in December. This will be the 22nd FIFA World Cup competition and the second World Cup to be hosted in Asia. The 2022 Football World Cup will also be the first tournament to take place in the Middle East, thus a lot of excitement is anticipated. In sixty-four matches over eight Qatari stadiums, thirty-two national teams qualified for the tournament.

Webuild S.p.A. and Cimolai were given the job of building the stadium in 2015. The stadium obtained sustainability certifications for energy efficiency, green design, and project management in January 2020. About thirty-five kilometers separate Doha from the stadium.

Al Thumama Stadium is called after the neighborhood where it is situated, which in turn received its name from a nearby tree. The stadium’s capacity will be cut in half after the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 TM, and it will be converted into a mixed-use leisure facility.

Al Bayt Stadium
Al Bayt Stadium ©middleeastmonitor

For those who enjoy the outdoors, Al Khor, a nearby town, offers adventure. Visitors can now go on kayaking tours through the Al Thakira mangroves and to bin Ghannam (also known as Purple) Island, which was the location of the Kassite-controlled purple dye business in the second millennium BC. The area is still popular for pearl diving and fishing.

What matches did and will the Al Bayt Stadium host?

After defeating the United Arab Emirates in a Gulf derby in Doha with five goals in the first half, the tournament’s hosts Qatar quickly advanced to the semifinals of the FIFA Arab Cup. A throng of 63,439 people watched the quarterfinal game at Al Bayt Football Stadium, which is a record for Qatar. After Akram Afif’s shot was blocked by defender Ali Salmeen and rebounded into the goal, Qatar took the lead in the sixth minute of play. After Almoez Ali successfully converted a penalty in the 28th minute, the UAE went farther behind. Having been fouled by UAE goalkeeper Ali Khaseif, Boualem Khoukhi converted Qatar’s second penalty of the half to virtually secure their spot in the final four.

In the 44th minute, Abdulaziz Hatem delivered a beautiful finish from outside the box to increase the advantage. This was Qatar’s third straight game with four goals versus the UAE. In stoppage time of the first half, Ali scored a goal from close range that was initially ruled offside but was permitted by the video assistant referee. The UAE stopped more damage in the second half, and Qatar defeated their adversaries 5-0.

Al Bayt Stadium will host the first game of the 2022 World Cup. The first game is slated to take place on November 20 in front of 60,000 spectators, according to FIFA and the organizing committee. The traditional tents of the nomadic peoples of Qatar and the surrounding area serve as the basis for the architectural style. All spectators will have covered seats thanks to the retractable roof it will have. The onsite parking will be able to accommodate 6,000 cars, 350 buses, the arrival and departure of 150 public buses/shuttles, as well as 1,000 taxis and water taxis. It will also be connected to several transportation systems. Around 60,000 World Cup spectators, including 1,000 press seats, will fill the Al Bayt Stadium.

Regarding the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the Al Bayt Stadium will host matches between Qatar, Ecuador, Morocco, Croatia, England, the United States, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, and Costa Rica. All these national teams are qualified in Groups A, F, B, and E. Also, the Al Bayt Stadium will host the Round of sixteen between the Winners of Group B and the Runners-up of Group A. A few days later, this football stadium will host the match in the quarterfinals between the Winners of Match 51 and the Winners of Match 52. The last match from the 2022 Football World Cup hosted by the Al Bayt Stadium is the one between the Winners of Match 59 and the Winners of Match 60 in the semi-finals.

World Cup Match Scheduled at Al Bayt Stadium

DateTimeTeam No. 1Team No. 2Round
20 November 202219:00QatarEcuadorGroup A
23 November 202213:00MoroccoCroatiaGroup F
25 November 202222:00EnglandUnited StatesGroup B
27 November 202222:00SpainGermanyGroup E
29 November 202218:00NetherlandsQatarGroup A
1 December 202222:00Costa RicaGermanyGroup E
4 December 202222:00Winners Group BRunners-up Group ARound of 16
10 December 202222:00Winners Match 51Winners Match 52Quarter-finals
14 December 202222:00Winners Match 59Winners Match 60Semi-finals
Al Bayt Stadium – World Cup Match Schedule

When was the Al Bayt Stadium inaugurated?

On November 30, 2021, the Al Bayt Stadium was officially opened in conjunction with the FIFA Arab Cup 2021 opening ceremony. It was followed by a game between Bahrain and the host nation of Qatar, in which the defending Asian champions prevailed 1-0 thanks to a header by Abdulaziz Hatem in the 69th minute. The official opening of the stadium’s neighboring park was scheduled for National Sports Day itself, February 11, 2020, in Qatar. Additionally, the Al Bayt Stadium offers opulent hotel suites and apartments with balconies overlooking the football field. Al Bayt Stadium’s construction cost $847 million.

Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir (head of state) of Qatar, was present at this occasion. Gianni Infantino, the president of FIFA, joined other heads of state and government, as well as presidents of member associations, to celebrate the inauguration of Al Bayt Stadium and the beginning of the FIFA Arab Cup 2021. Five games, including the event final on December 18th, 2021, were played in the recently constructed stadium during the FIFA Arab Cup in 2021.

Al Bayt Stadium © gulf-times

There were several sheiks and ministers present at the closing ceremony, including His Highness the Father Amir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, His Highness Personal Representative of the Amir Sheikh Jassim bin Hamad al-Thani, His Highness Sheikh Abdullah bin Khalifa al-Thani, HE Sheikh Jassim bin Khalifa al-Thani, HE the Prime Minister and Minister of Interior Sheikh Khalid bin Khalif

Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy (SC) secretary general Hassan Al Thawadi remarked, “The opening of Al Bayt Stadium and precinct will honor Qatar’s heritage while fully embracing the country’s worldwide future. The development we have made thus far also reaffirms our steadfast dedication to offering magnificent experiences in 2022 and beyond”.

The Al Bayt Stadium and the energy center building were built by Qatari contractor Galfar Al Misnad and Italian contractors Salini Impregilo Group and Cimolai. In the landscaping and underground utility works, Qatari contractors (Bin Omran Trading and Al Sulaiteen Agricultural & Industrial Complex) provided their services. The stadium’s overall construction was supervised by KEO International Consultants.

The region’s and Qatar’s historic nomadic tents are the inspiration for the building’s architecture. The Al Bayt Stadium structure is built to maintain a comfortable temperature year-round. Four stands that link to a ventilation system that can close and open in 20 minutes make up the retractable roof.

To further evoke the historic nomadic people’s tents, the exterior of the Al Bayt Stadium’s PTFE membrane was painted in the traditional colors of black, red, and white. The structure also features weaving designs from tribes that lived off the land.

According to the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy, “Traditionally, the tents of nomadic tribes and families in Qatar could be distinguished by black stripes like those on the arena’s striking exterior, and by the vivid sadu designs that would greet visitors once inside the stadium.”

The Al Bayt Stadium is the second-largest stadium after Lusail Stadium is Qatar’s Al Bayt Stadium, one of seven stadiums being renovated for the Football World Cup in 2022. Dar Al-Handasah oversaw the stadium’s design. The four stands that make up the tent-like structure each have peaked roofs and outer walls made of woven fiberglass membrane made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). To further evoke the nomadic people’s tents, the exterior of the PTFE membrane is painted in traditional black, white, and red hues. The Al Bayt Stadium is enclosed by a retractable canopy that joins the four stands.

Fans will have a wonderful experience thanks to the design of Al Bayt Stadium, which gives a contemporary interpretation of historic tradition. After the competition, Al Bayt Stadium will be transformed into a 5-star hotel, shopping mall, gym, and multipurpose hall to benefit the neighborhood. Near the Al Bayt Stadium, a branch of Aspetar, Qatar’s premier sports medicine center, will open. Specialized trails for running, cycling, and riding horses will further encourage physical exercise. The stadium honors both Qatar’s cultural legacy and the bond between its inhabitants and their natural surroundings.

The name of the Al Bayt Stadium, which is being provided by the Aspire Zone Foundation, is derived from the Arabic for “tent,” bayt al sha’ar, which was historically used by nomadic groups in Qatar and the Gulf. Al Bayt Stadium will entertain visitors from all over the world and invite them to experience the traditional culture of Qatar, just like the country’s renowned hospitality.

Qatar’s past and present are honored in the stadium’s design. Its construction will be an example of green development with the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy’s sustainability objectives front and center. Around it, community facilities will develop. This arena will serve as a world-class venue for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 and serve as a role model for future stadium construction.

Al Khor, which is 35 km north of Doha, is known for its pearl diving and fishing, and its allures have drawn people from the desert’s original inhabitants to the coast. The potential of Al Khor to unite many cultures made it an obvious choice to host a Football World Cup 2022 stadium.

Fans are in wonder and salivating over the stadium cooling technology and captivating architecture of the stadiums being built. At the still-under-construction Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor city, the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC), the group in charge of providing the World Cup’s infrastructure, has now displayed jaw-dropping Sky Boxes. The stadium’s presentation and plan were made in 2014, but construction did not begin until later that year.

With its colors of red, white, and black, the stadium’s design is reminiscent of the interior of a bedouin tent. The stadium’s retractable roof can be opened and shut in under 20 minutes. In addition to being very striking, the stadium’s architecture is also quite functional because the retractable shade of the tent-like structure complements the stadium’s cooling system. The goal is to provide the fans with a cozy environment inside the stadium without consuming any additional power.

Al Bayt Stadium can accommodate 60,000 spectators in three tiers. After the World Cup, the stadium’s capacity will be reduced to 32,000 seats due to the removal of the top tier.

The hospitality wing houses the most opulent five-star hotel rooms with every kind of extravagance imaginable. The suites, which provide a fantastic view of the field within the stadium, will be converted into Sky Boxes by FIFA and promoted as such throughout the World Cup 2022. The Al Bayt stadium has ninety-six such rooms in all.

Consider watching a World Cup game in opulent luxury, along with all the amenities a top-notch hotel can provide. The large rooms include desks with views of the field and comfortable beds that can be made into sofas so you can watch the game’s top players demonstrate their prowess on the field.

“We have developed a pretty original approach with this. The concept existed from the beginning. The initiative is propelled by the businesspeople so that it can last. One of the ideas was to build a hotel in Qatar for the visiting teams. FIFA will transform it into sky boxes for the World Cup, thus the furniture was chosen with that in mind. According to Engineer Mohamed Ahmed, SC Project Manager for Al Bayt Stadium-Al Khor City, the beds can be transformed into sofas and vice versa.

“We gave FIFA the facts, and they approved of the concept. Every amenity is found in a five-star hotel. There are ninety-six rooms, and during WC, every single one of them will be transformed into sky boxes.

The rooms will not be useless after the World Cup, though. Given how sustainably the SC has designed Qatar 2022, the Sky Boxes in the stadium’s top concourse will be transformed into a complete five-star hotel following the World Cup.

“The project is exceptional in every way. From the form to the accessibility and design,” Mohamed Ahmed continued.

After the competition, the arena will impressively reach even more people around the world. It will be transportable, just like a true nomad’s tent. After the FIFA World Cup 2022, the upper deck of the modular seats will be taken out and donated to underdeveloped countries in need of athletic facilities as a permanent reminder of Qatar’s kind nature.

The upper layer of the stadium’s seats will be taken out after the competition, bringing the venue’s capacity down to 32,000. These stands will be donated, according to the tournament’s organizers, to aid in the development of sporting facilities in other nations.

The Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy predicted that after the competition, the arena would “reach even more people around the world in a stunning way.” “It is transportable, just like a real nomad’s tent.” After the seating is taken out, a high-end hotel will be constructed inside the upper tier. After the competition, several other facilities, including a shopping center, dining options, a gym, a sports medicine hospital, and a community center will also be constructed inside the stadium.

What about Al Bayt Stadium’s plans for sustainability?

The stadium has earned several certifications for sustainable design and construction, construction management techniques, and the effectiveness of its energy center under the Global Sustainability Assessment System (GSAS). Additionally, the stadium was given a five-star GSAS grade.

Al Bayt Football Stadium, which was developed in collaboration with the Aspire Foundation, was given a Class A* rating by the Global Sustainability Assessment System (GSAS). The stadium conserves energy and water by using modern technologies and green building materials. In keeping with the tournament’s broader sustainability ideals, the upper tier of its modular seating will be donated to poor countries in need of sporting infrastructure after the competition.

As part of Qatar’s efforts to organize the most environmentally friendly World Cup ever, the Stadium was created with the greatest energy-use strategies and green building materials. The Supreme Committee makes further green building efforts outside of the arena. The neighboring city of Al Khor has been included in the model’s expansion. Numerous parks, lakes, and other green areas will be present in the city, as well as protected green belt property that extends from the stadium to the sea.

Al Bayt Stadium’s venue manager, Dr. Nasser Al Hajeri, stated: “We are really delighted to have received a five-star sustainability rating from GORD. This is evidence of how hard everyone who contributed to this enormous project—including all our contractors and stakeholders—worked. When it hosts the opening game of Qatar 2022, this stadium will be the center of attention for the entire world, and it will remain so for an exceptionally long time for the residents of Al Khor.

The legacy attributes of Al Bayt are also noteworthy. After the World Cup, the upper-tier seats will be dismantled and used to build sports facilities in Qatar and abroad. A shopping center, food court, gym, and multipurpose hall will be built into the stadium building, and the sky box level will be converted into a five-star hotel. The building blocks, which are the size of shipping containers and are being delivered to the port with the materials needed to construct the stadium, are all recyclable.

Al Bayt has a few sustainability elements and was created to imitate a traditional tent used by nomadic people in Qatar and the surrounding area. While the transparent retractable roof decreases the need for energy consumption and enables natural sunshine to aid in lawn growth, the light-colored external membrane reduces heat absorption and supports the effective use of cooling equipment.

Most of the building supplies were produced in Qatar, and 20% of them were made from recycled materials. Steel, windows, oak doors, and precast concrete were only a few of the essential items that were supplied ethically. Water-saving fixtures and fittings are employed throughout the space in addition to LED lighting.

Some of the heritage infrastructures, like the area around the stadium, are already in operation. This includes a public park, walking and biking paths, playgrounds, coffee shops, and dining options. On this year’s National Sports Day in February, Al Bayt Park officially opened.

According to Engineer Bodour Al Meer, Senior Manager for Sustainability & Environment at the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy, “Al Bayt has a unique sustainability story. Every stadium being created for the World Cup has one. Long after the competition, its impact will be felt, notably by the people of Al Khor. Because of the current renovation, Al Bayt will remain a significant monument for many years to come, all thanks to Qatar’s hosting of the largest sporting event in the world.

Al Bayt Stadium’s venue manager, Dr. Nasser Al Hajeri, stated: “We are really delighted to have received a five-star sustainability rating from GORD. This is evidence of the diligent work put in by all parties concerned in this enormous project, including all our contractors and stakeholders. When it hosts the opening game of Qatar 2022, this stadium will be the center of attention for the entire world, and it will remain so for an exceptionally long time for the residents of Al Khor.

The legacy attributes of Al Bayt Stadium are also noteworthy. After the World Cup, the upper-tier seats will be dismantled and used to build sports facilities in Qatar and abroad. A shopping center, food court, gym, and multipurpose hall will be built into the stadium building, and the sky box level will be converted into a five-star hotel.

Some of the heritage infrastructures, like the area around the stadium, are already in operation. This includes a public park, walking and biking paths, playgrounds, coffee shops, and dining options. On this year’s National Sports Day in February, Al Bayt Park officially opened.

The Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy’s Senior Manager for Sustainability & Environment, Engineer Bodour Al Meer, stated: “Each World Cup stadium has a distinctive sustainability story, including Al Bayt. Long after the competition, especially in the Al Khor community, its impact will be felt. Because to the current renovation, Al Bayt will remain a significant monument for many years to come, all thanks to Qatar’s hosting of the largest sporting event in the world.

What other issues are related to the Al Bayt Stadium?

Amnesty International, a human rights organization, asserted that approximately one hundred migrant workers at the Al Bayt stadium, fifty kilometers north of Doha, have not yet received all their unpaid wages after going up to seven months without payment. As Qatar trims costs in the wake of the coronavirus economic crisis, numerous sources told AFP earlier this month that World Cup organizers will let go of an unspecified number of staff members. One of the highest per-capita infection rates is seen in Qatar.

Over 6500 migrant workers from Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka perished between 2010 and 2020 while working on World Cup stadiums in Qatar, according to a 2021 investigation by The Guardian. An incredibly sizeable portion of the migrant workers who have died since 2011 was only in the country because Qatar was awarded the right to host the World Cup, according to The Guardian’s figures, which did not include occupation or place of employment. Consequently, deaths could not be linked to the World Cup construction program.

Construction News responded to the investigation by recalling two reports: first, a 2014 BBC Newsnight investigation that alleged migrant workers employed by Carillion subcontractors in Qatar were forced to work in unsafe conditions and had wages withheld; and second, a 2019 Business and Human Rights Resource Centre report that claimed construction companies working in Qatar and the UAE were “failing” to protect workers’ rights, including former Carillion subsidiary Al-Futt.

The timing of the World Cup in the summer desert heat, the treatment of construction workers building the stadiums, and the actual bid for hosting rights have all sullied Qatar’s World Cup candidacy. The organizers in Qatar have “vehemently” refuted claims that their winning bid was dishonest.

The Sunday Times asserted that it had uncovered millions of documents proving that Bin Hammam, a former member of the FIFA executive committee, paid football authorities $5 million in exchange for their support for Qatar.

In the past week, sponsors Adidas, Sony, and Visa have urged FIFA to fully investigate claims of bribery to help Qatar win the 2022 World Cup. Any wrongdoing has been refuted by the Gulf state.

Since Qatar gained the right to host the World Cup ten years ago, more than 6,500 migrant laborers from India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka have perished there, the Guardian has learned. The data, which was collated from official sources, show that since the night in December 2010 when the streets of Doha were thronged with jubilant crowds celebrating Qatar’s triumph, an average of 12 migrant workers from these five south Asian countries have perished each week.

According to data from India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, there were 5,927 migrant worker fatalities between 2011 and 2020. Additional 824 deaths of Pakistani workers were reported between 2010 and 2020, according to data from Pakistan’s embassy in Qatar. Since these data do not account for deaths from several nations, including the Philippines and Kenya, which send considerable numbers of workers to Qatar, the overall death toll is significantly greater. Additionally excluded are deaths that took place in the latter months of 2020.

In the last ten years, Qatar has started an unparalleled development spree, mostly in anticipation of the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Numerous significant projects, including a new airport, roads, public transportation systems, hotels, and a new city that will host the World Cup final, have either been finished or are currently under progress in addition to the seven new stadiums.

Since these data do not account for deaths from several nations, including the Philippines and Kenya, which send considerable numbers of workers to Qatar, the overall death toll is significantly greater. Additionally excluded are deaths that took place in the latter months of 2020.

In the last ten years, Qatar has started an unparalleled development spree, mostly in anticipation of the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Numerous significant projects, including a new airport, roads, public transportation systems, hotels, and a new city that will host the World Cup final, have either been finished or are currently under progress in addition to the seven new stadiums. Thirty-four of the thirty-seven deaths of construction employees directly associated with building World Cup stadiums have been deemed “non-work related” by the organization of the event. The term’s use has drawn criticism from experts since it has occasionally been used to describe occupational fatalities, such as several workers who have collapsed and died on stadium construction projects.

The results reveal Qatar’s failure to safeguard its 2 million-strong migrant workforce or even investigate the reasons for the ominously high death rate among the most youthful employees. Many heartbreaking tales of families who have lost their primary earner, are battling for recompense, and are unsure of the circumstances behind their loved one’s passing can be found behind the numbers.

When Ghal Singh Rai from Nepal applied for a job as a sweeper in a camp for construction workers constructing the Education City World Cup stadium, he had to pay £1,000 in recruitment fees. A week after coming, he committed suicide. Mohammad Shahid Miah, a Bangladeshi worker, died from electrocution in his worker’s housing when water came into touch with exposed electrical cables.

Madhu Bollapally’s family in India has never been able to comprehend how the 43-year-old, who was in good health, passed away from “natural causes” while working in Qatar. On the floor of his dorm room, his body was discovered.

In 2019, it was discovered that many worker deaths in Qatar are caused by the country’s extreme summer heat. Research commissioned by the UN’s International Labour Organization, which found that workers experienced considerable heat stress for at least four months of the year, corroborated The Guardian’s results.

In 2014, a report from the lawyers for the Qatari government suggested that its commission research into the cardiac arrest fatalities of migrant workers and alter the law to “allow for an autopsy… in all cases of unexpected or sudden death.” Government action has been minimal.

According to Gulf researcher for Human Rights Watch Hiba Zayadin, Qatar continues to “drag its feet on this vital and urgent matter with obvious disdain for workers’ lives.” “We have requested that Qatar revise its law on autopsies to mandate forensic investigations into all unexpected or unforeseen deaths, and pass legislation to require that all death certificates include a mention of a medically significant cause of death,” she said.

According to the government of Qatar, the death toll is comparable to the size of the migrant labor force, and the statistics consider white-collar workers who passed away naturally after residing in Qatar for a long time. Additionally, just 20% of expatriates from the nations in issue engage in the construction industry, and less than 10% of fatalities among this group were caused by workplace accidents.

“Considering the size and demography of the population, the mortality rate in these localities is within the normal range. However, every life lost is tragic, and our nation makes every effort to prevent every fatality, according to a statement released by the Qatari government’s spokesperson.

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