Al Thumama Stadium – 2022 FIFA World Cup Stadium

One of the eight stadiums that will be constructed for the FIFA World Cup in Qatar in 2022 is the Al Thumama Stadium. It is close to Hamad International Airport. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, which will begin on November 20 and conclude on December 18. The officials of the 2022 FIFA World Cup decided to hold the famous cup in Qatar in November due to the country’s extreme summer heat. The 22nd FIFA World Cup and the second World Cup held in Asia will take place this year. The sixty-four matches between the thirty-two teams that qualified for the tournament will be played in eight stadiums in Qatar including Al Thumama Stadium.

How was constructed the Al Thumama Stadium?

The construction work is heavily supervised by Tekfen Construction of Turkey and Al Jaber Engineering of Qatar. The Al Thumama Stadium, designed by Arab Engineering Bureau Chief Architect Ibrahim Jaidah, has a capacity of 40,000 seats and will be surrounded by a 50,000 m2 (540,000 sq. ft) public park. Following the World Cup, half of the stadium’s seats will be removed and donated to other countries. It opened on October 22, 2021.

Al Thumama Stadium is a stunning structure. The stadium’s designers outdid themselves here in terms of beauty and tradition. Amazing is each World Cup stadium. Al Thumama Stadium will be one of the first things fans who arrive by plane at Hamad International Airport will see.

One of the eight stadiums that will be constructed for the FIFA World Cup in Qatar in 2022 is the Al Thumama Stadium. It is close to Hamad International Airport. The construction work is heavily supervised by Tekfen Construction of Turkey and Al Jaber Engineering of Qatar. The Al Thumama Stadium, designed by Arab Engineering Bureau Chief Architect Ibrahim Jaidah, has a capacity of 40,000 seats and will be surrounded by a 50,000 m2 (540,000 sq. ft) public park. Here is the photograph of the Al Thumama Stadium which is looks very much beatiful from outside.

Al Thumama Stadium
Al Thumama Stadium © Hi Sun Choi

Following the World Cup, half of the Al Thumama Stadium‘s seats will be removed and donated to other countries. It opened on October 22, 2021. The Qatari government announced reforms in October 2019 that established a bond. In any case, different components of the framework that can leave bosses with some command over their laborers seem scheduled to remain.

The design-build project gave the structural, construction support, and façade specialists the chance to collaborate with our CORE studio, which aided at various stages of the work. CORE developed Dynamo workflows for automating clash detection from Navisworks and Revit, among other things. By processing clash detection data, the tool helped automate the creation of wall openings, saving time and assisting the team in meeting important milestones. Custom workflows in Grasshopper and Dynamo were used by CORE studio to automate the modeling of all precast concrete seating components within the bowl.

The Al Thumama Stadium will transition into “legacy mode” following the World Cup, consisting of a hotel and approximately 20,000 seats. This will be accomplished by building the hotel on one side of the upper concourse and removing the upper seating bowl. Qatar is working around the clock to prepare all seven new stadiums in time for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022.

The Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC) has revealed that the stadium’s concrete frame, upper-tier stands, and roof columns are all finished. Al Thumama Stadium recently reached twenty million working hours. The venue, which is in Al Thumama Stadium near Hamad International Airport, is expected to host games up to and including the quarterfinal stage and will have a capacity of 40,000 when it is finished.

The gahfiya, a traditional woven cap that has been worn by men in many Arab countries for centuries, was the inspiration for the stadium’s design, which was created by renowned Qatari architect Ibrahim M. Jaidah. The “gahfiya,” a traditional woven cap that Arab men have worn for centuries, is the design inspiration for Al Thumama Stadium. Ibrahim M. Jaidah, a Qatari architect, was the first to design a FIFA World Cup venue. During the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the stadium will host eight games all the way up to the quarterfinals.

Al Thumama Stadium © Hi Sun Choi

The stadium’s bleachers have been installed, as have the roof and façade construction. Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing work, seat installation, and finishing were all installed as well. A 50,000 square-meter public park surrounding the Al Thumama Stadium, finished in 2021. Look at the beauty of Al Thumama Stadium from outside view.

Also, 20,000 seats will be removed from the Al Thumama Stadium following the conclusion of the 2022 FIFA World Cup and donated to nations in need of sporting infrastructure. The upper stands of the stadium will be replaced by a boutique hotel, and sporting events will continue to take place there.

“We are very proud to have achieved this milestone,” said SC project director Engineer Saoud Al Ansari at Al Thumama Stadium. Our top priority is the health and safety of our workforce, and milestones like this only serve to demonstrate that fact.” The Al Thumama Stadium, the sixth stadium that has been proposed for the 2022 World Cup, was built to look like a gahfiya head cap, which is a symbol of independence and dignity.

The Al Thumama Stadium, constructed in the southern suburbs of Doha and designed by Qatari architect M. Jaidah, Chief Architect of the Arab Engineering Bureau, has a capacity of approximately 40,000 fans. Al Jaber Engineering, based in Qatar, and Tekfen Construction, based in Turkey, formed a joint venture to carry out the site’s construction. According to Jaodah, “the design is a nod to the past while offering an exciting glimpse into Qatar’s tomorrow”. The gahfiya is an important part of every young boy’s path to adulthood in Qatari culture.

He continued by saying that his concept for the design of the Al Thumama Stadium was influenced by this rite of passage. It is a stadium that represents Qatar’s youth and its ascent to prominence on the international sporting stage, and it is prepared to welcome the world in 2022.

The Al Thumama Stadium will house a variety of amenities following the tournament, including a boutique hotel and Aspetar Sports Clinic branch. The stadium precinct will be transformed into a community hub with facilities for swimming, handball, tennis, and other sports.

According to one of the project’s leaders, the construction of Al Thumama Stadium has provided Qatar and Turkey with additional opportunities for “harmonious” collaboration. The design plans for the sixth proposed 2022 FIFA World Cup stadium were made available by the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC). Al Jaber Engineering, a Qatari contractor, and Tekfen, the largest construction company in Turkey, were working together on the project to construct the venue by 2020.

Al Jaber Engineering’s CEO, engineer Osama Hadid, stated that Tekfen is a world-class contractor with specific experience designing and building FIFA-compliant stadiums, despite our knowledge of the local market, our largest fleet of equipment, and 12,000 employees. He said that they were proud to be a part of Qatar’s huge project. They were overjoyed, as a Qatari business, to have been chosen to provide a venue for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. He concluded his speech by saying that “This also means that the world can see what a Qatari contractor can deliver”.

The gahfiya headdress, which is worn by men all over the Arab world, serves as the inspiration for the design of Al Thumama Stadium. Tekfen brings specific experience in structural steel prefabrication and installation, which will be crucial for building the stadium’s facade, to make this design a reality. The 80,000-seat Ataturk Olympic Stadium and the 68,000-seat Baku Olympic Stadium, both of which are FIFA-compliant, were built by the Turkish construction giant.

Chairman of Tekfen Construction Cahit Oklap made the following remarks regarding the joint venture by saying that they have successfully combined their complementary strengths.

“This joint venture can undertake other challenging projects and become a long-term solution for the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy,” according to “the harmony is based on mutual respect of the partners”, he said.

The contractors have begun earthwork at the site of the 40,000-seat stadium and are continuing with the procurement supply chain activities. The project team’s headquarters on the site have completed their offices, and the first batch of concrete is expected to be poured ahead of schedule and continue track throughout the project.

An Aspetar branch the sports medicine and orthopedics hospital—has been established inside the stadium to provide players participating in the World Cup with medical care. Half of the seats will be taken down and given to countries that need them most after the World Cup is over; the hospital portion will remain. They will continue to support athletes, whether from Qatar or elsewhere, there.

Al Thumama Stadium’s seating capacity will be reduced to 20,000 after Qatar 2022. The 20,000 seats that will be taken out of the stadium will be given to countries that need sports facilities. Additionally, a local location of the renowned Aspetar Sports Clinic will open. The upper stands of the stadium will be replaced by a boutique hotel.

The SC website added, “It is an arena that represents the shared Arab heritage that inspired its creation and represents the youth of Qatar, the country’s emergence as a major player on the global sporting scene, and its shared Arab heritage.”

In May 2018, the venue received the prestigious MIPIM / The Architectural Review Future Project Award for its distinctive design, which was inspired by the traditional gahfiya cap.

The prestigious MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Award in the sport and stadiums category has been given to Al Thumama Stadium, which has been proposed as the location for the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup. Ibrahim Mohamed Jaidah, the chief architect of the Arab Engineering Bureau (AEB) and the stadium’s designer, was presented with the honor at a ceremony in Cannes, France.

Jaidah was there on behalf of the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC), which oversees building the infrastructure for the Football World Cup in 2022. In twelve categories, the MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Awards, now in their 17th year, recognize excellence in projects that have not yet been completed or are in the process of being completed. A renowned international jury reviews entries before they are published in the Architectural Review.

Al Thumama Stadium received the award because of its connection to surrounding urban and environmental planning and the technological innovations used in its design and construction. Jaidah commented on the award, saying that “The prestigious MIPIM/AR Future Project Award for Al Thumama Stadium is a great honor. This is only the beginning of the accolades Al Thumama, as well as other stadiums built for the 2022 FIFA World Cup, will receive. Each of these stadiums is a masterpiece in its own right”.

Jaidah went on to say that those were innovative stadia yet are planned in a way that mirrors our way of life and supports our personality, mentioning the absolute honor to be a part of a project that has received such a prestigious and significant award, and Qatar is receiving international recognition.

Jaidah added, “Contextually appropriate and environmentally sustainable solutions are the foundation of the design approach for Al Thumama.”Al Thumama supports a sustainable environment and local community in line with the SC’s mission.

In the meantime, Saoud al-Ansari, the project manager for the SC’s Al Thumama Stadium, stated that the Al Thumama Stadium’s unique design, which is rooted in our culture and traditions, has been honored with the MIPIM award.

He went on to say, “The award is also the culmination of all efforts that have been put into the design and planning of this proposed FIFA World Cup venue.” “We are proud that such a Qatari-inspired and developed vision has been recognized internationally.”

The “gahfiya” headdress that men in Qatar and the MENA region wear are the inspiration for the stadium’s design, which is based on valuing and preserving its context. To reduce the structure’s long-term carbon footprint, solar-powered cooling technology was also incorporated into the design. Both the design and the construction are aiming for a four-star Global Sustainability Assessment System certification.

Al Thumama Stadium’s main contractor work is expected to be finished by 2020. The modular upper tiers of the 40,000-seat stadium will make it possible to reduce the capacity to 20,000 in legacy mode, with the remaining seats being donated to nations in need of sporting infrastructure. The stadium will be accessible to people with disabilities.

AEB is Qatar’s first locally established award-winning architectural and engineering consulting firm. Over 1,500 projects from the Middle East and Southeast Asia of various typologies are included in its extensive portfolio.

What matches did or will the Al Thumama Stadium host?

The Al Thumama Stadium received the MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Award in the Sports and Stadiums category in May 2018. The stadium hosted six matches during the FIFA Arab Cup 2021 tournament, including a semi-final match between hosts Qatar and Algeria. The stadium was inaugurated on October 22, 2021, during the Emir Cup Final.

For the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the Al Thumama Stadium will host matches between Senegal, Netherlands, Spain, Costa Rica, Qatar, Belgium, Morocco, Iran, the United States, and Canada. All of them are part of Groups A, E, F, and B. Also, the Al Thumama Stadium will host the Round of sixteen on 4 December, at 18:00, between the Winners of Group D and the Runners-up of Group C, while on 10 December, at the same hour, the Al Thumama Stadium will host the match between the Winners of Match 55 and the Winners of Match 56 in the quarterfinals.

DateTimeTeam No. 1Team No. 2Round
21 November 202219:00SenegalNetherlandsGroup A
23 November 202219:00SpainCosta RicaGroup E
25 November 202216:00QatarSenegalGroup A
27 November 202216:00BelgiumMoroccoGroup F
29 November 202222:00IranUnited StatesGroup B
1 December 202218:00CanadaMoroccoGroup F
4 December 202218:00Winners Group DRunners-up Group CRound of 16
10 December 202218:00Winners Match 55Winners Match 56Quarter-finals
Al Thumama Stadium matches Schedule

What other issues are related to the Al Thumama Stadium?

In October 2019, the Qatari government announced reforms that established a non-discriminatory framework. On the other hand, other parts of the framework that can give managers some control over their employees appear to be staying. FIFA, the governing body of the 2022 World Cup, oversaw the specialists’ rights issue for the host nation. The FIFA and the Supreme Committee have established robust systems to prevent and mitigate wage abuse on FIFA World Cup sites. They have also established mechanisms for workers to raise potential grievances and practices to provide for remediation in cases where businesses fail to live up to our standards.

Also Read: History of FIFA World Cup

In a report and accompanying video that was released today, Human Rights Watch stated that the efforts made by Qatari authorities to safeguard the right of migrant workers to receive accurate and timely wages have been unsuccessful. Withheld and unpaid wages, as well as other wage abuses, are persistent and widespread across at least 60 Qatari businesses, despite a few recent reforms.

The report titled “Salary Abuses Facing Migrant Workers Ahead of Qatar’s FIFA World Cup 2022” demonstrates that employers all over Qatar frequently violate workers’ rights to wages and that Qatar has failed to fulfill its 2017 commitment to the International Labor Organization (ILO) to protect migrant workers from wage abuses and to eliminate the kafala system, which ties migrant workers’ visas to their employers.

Case after case of wage abuse was documented by Human Rights Watch in a variety of occupations, including security guards, servers, baristas, bouncers, cleaners, management staff, and construction workers.

Michael Page, deputy Middle East and North Africa director at Human Rights Watch, stated, “Migrant workers are still facing delayed, unpaid, and deducted wages ten years after Qatar won the right to host the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup 2022.”We have heard of workers being forced to work in abusive conditions out of fear of retaliation, indebted workers working in Qatar for underpaid wages, and workers starving because of delayed wages.

For this report, Human Rights Watch reviewed legal documents and reports as well as conducted interviews with over ninety-three migrant workers who were employed by over sixty companies or employers.

Qatar has relied on two million migrant workers or 95% of the country’s total workforce. For the FIFA World Cup 2022, many are building or fixing stadiums, transportation, hotels, and other infrastructure. Many of them come to Qatar hoping to find stable jobs and incomes, but they are instead met with wage abuses that push them further into debt and keep them stuck in these jobs with no way to get out.

Fifty-nine workers claimed that they had not received their wages. Nine workers claimed that their wages had not been paid because their employers claimed they did not have enough customers. Despite working more than 10 hours per day, fifty-five people claimed they were not compensated for overtime; thirteen of them said that their previous employment contracts had been replaced with ones that were more favorable to their employers. Twenty said they did not get the mandatory benefits at the end of their service; twelve employees claimed that their pay was withheld arbitrarily by their employers.

Since Covid-19, wage violations have become even worse. Some employers used the pandemic as a pretext to withhold wages or refuse to pay detained and forcibly repatriated workers their unpaid wages. Some workers stated that they had no money even to buy food. Others claimed that they needed money to get by.

A human resources manager in Qatar who is 38 years old and works for a construction company that has a contract to work on the outside of a World Cup stadium said that his monthly payment has been delayed at least five times in 2018 and 2019. He stated, “I am impacted because I am behind on my credit card payments, rent, and children’s school fees due to the delayed salary. My salary is two months behind schedule even now. The situation is the same for everyone on my level of staff, including workers. The laborers cannot get loans from the bank as I can, so I have no idea how they manage.”

Human Rights Watch discovered that one of the factors that made abuse easier was the kafala system. Qatar made a promise in 2017 to end the kafala system. Although some measures have made it less effective, the system still gives employers unchecked power and control over migrant workers.

Deceptive recruitment practices that require workers to pay between US$700 and $2,600 to secure jobs in Qatar are another factor that contributes to wage abuses. Workers in Qatar arrive in debt and shackled to jobs that frequently pay less than promised when they arrive. 72 of the workers interviewed by Human Rights Watch admitted to taking out loans to cover recruitment costs. Wage abuse is exacerbated by business practices like the so-called “pay when paid” clause. Subcontractors who have not been paid can defer paying workers through these procedures.

A 34-year-old engineer who went to labor court over seven months of unpaid wages and has been borrowing money from friends in Qatar to send to his family in Nepal stated, “Since August 2019, I have been waiting for money.” He went to court for the first time last year, and he is still waiting for his payments “Since I do not even have money for food, I am starving. If I do not get my salary through the legal process, how will I pay back my loans? Sometimes I feel like I must kill myself.

In Qatar and the Gulf, where various iterations of the kafala system are in place, wage abuses are among the most prevalent and devastating violations of the rights of migrant workers. The Wage Protection System (WPS) was established in 2015 by the Qatari government, followed by the Labor Dispute Resolution Committees in 2017 and the Workers’ Support and Insurance Fund in 2018 to combat wage abuse.

However, Human Rights Watch discovered that the WPS is more accurately referred to as a wage monitoring system with significant oversight capacity gaps. Workers’ ATM cards, which are supposed to be used to withdraw wages, are frequently confiscated by employers. In a similar vein, workers are concerned about employer retaliation and find it difficult, costly, time-consuming, and ineffective to take wage abuse cases to committees. Additionally, the Workers’ Support and Insurance Fund, which was created to ensure that workers are compensated when businesses are unable to do so, was only established earlier this year.

The government announced significant reforms in October 2019 that would allow all migrant workers in Qatar to change or leave their jobs without the consent of their employers and establish a non-discriminatory minimum wage. However, it appears that other aspects of the system that may grant employers some degree of control over their employees will continue. It was anticipated that the reforms would be implemented in January 2020.

This report’s findings and questions were sent to Qatar’s Interior and Labor Ministries, FIFA, and Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy by Human Rights Watch. We received responses from FIFA, Qatar’s Government Communications Office (GCO), and the Supreme Committee.

FIFA wrote in response to a request for comment. Discrimination and wage abuse are not tolerated by FIFA or its trusted partner, the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy. FIFA and the SC have established robust systems to prevent and mitigate wage abuse on FIFA World Cup sites, as well as mechanisms for workers to raise potential grievances and practices to provide for remediation in cases where businesses fail to live up to our standards because we are aware of the importance of wage protection measures in Qatar through our work to protect the rights of FIFA World Cup workers. Workers and NGOs with concerns about Football World Cup sites are strongly encouraged to contact the SC’s Workers’ Welfare hotline (see here). The teams on the ground will be able to verify this information and take the necessary actions whenever they are required, always in the best interest of their respective workers.

Through the Workers’ Welfare hotline of the Supreme Committee, FIFA encouraged workers and nongovernmental organizations to voice concerns regarding Football World Cup sites.

Page stated, “Qatar has two years until players kick the first ball at the FIFA World Cup.” Qatar must demonstrate that it will fulfill its promise to eliminate the kafala system, enhance salary monitoring systems, accelerate redress mechanisms, and implement additional measures to combat wage abuse before the clock runs out.

FIFA as the administering body of the World cup 2022 took responsibility for the specialists’ privileges matter of the facilitating country and after being requested to remark on something very similar, the association expressed “FIFA and its confided-in accomplice, the Preeminent Panel for Conveyance and Heritage, have a zero-resistance strategy to any type of separation and to wage misuse.

FIFA and the Supreme Committee have established robust systems to prevent and mitigate wage abuse on FIFA World Cup sites, as well as mechanisms for workers to raise potential grievances and practices to provide for remediation in cases where companies fail to live up to our standards, as a result of our work to protect the rights of FIFA World Cup workers in Qatar.

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